woldscience
 Home > News > Science & Technology News










+  Text   -   

A NASA astronaut responds to Elon Musk anywhere on earth under an hour plan



India October 12(IM): If you are thrilled after hearing about Elon Musk’s plan to use rockets for travelling anywhere in the world in less than an hour, think twice as the ride may not be as rosy as imagined. A NASA astronaut has come out with a warning that the ride may well be a nauseating experience.Social media circles had gone abuzz with excitement after Elon Musk announced last month that his company SpaceX is planning to build a high power launch vehicle i.e. BFR to make long distance travel a short time affair.It was also claimed that this swift ride would be cheap and reasonable thereby making it accessible to all. Further, a video was uploaded by the company showing the simulation of the rocket ride.Leroy Chiao, a former NASA astronaut said in a report by Business Insider, that the trip may not be for the faint hearted.According to him, the trip would be a ‘suborbital flight halfway around the world.’ Explaining that the initial stage of the ride will pass without any troubles, he warned that it will be a lot different in the second stage.The conversion to ‘zero gravity’ will be extremely troubling for the traveller making the vehicle a ‘vomit comet,’ he said. “You feel the fluid shift [in your body], kind of like laying heads-down on an incline, because there is no longer gravity pulling your body fluids down into your legs. All this can cause nausea."While assuring that the landing stage of the rocket will restore normality, he said that the experience won’t be suitable for most, both economically and physically. “This would not be for the faint of heart, and it is difficult to see how this would be inexpensive…But the one thing I've learned from observing Elon, is not to count him out."

 Share this article
 Read other Science & Technology News stories
 Visit news Home Page for fresh content

  India News   Entertainment   Sports   Health   Business   Science   World